the taste space

Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles

Posted in Desserts, Favourites by janet @ the taste space on August 30, 2010

I had a love/hate relationship with my bicycle last week. I still loved my bike, but I think she had enough of me after I biked 250km last weekend to/from Woodstock. It wasn’t the distance that bothered her, it was the rain. The light rain, we could deal with, but the torrential downpour, is what she was complaining about.

When I arrived to greet her Monday morning, a bit earlier than usual to take her down to get cleaned before heading to work, her back tire was flat. I can do this, I thought to myself. So I removed the tire, replaced the tube and put the tire back on. It took me a good 30-45 minutes, but I was still pleased with myself. My first time changing a tire solo!

Then I pumped up the tire. I almost had it at 120 psi. I know it can be difficult to pump it up that high, so I almost left it at 90. Nah, I’ll give it a good push or two, I can do it! So I pumped, and pumped… and then FOOSH!! My inner tube exploded and popped off my tire! Without any extra inner tubes, I had to hightail it to work by subway instead.

Emails flew between my family and friends. I obviously squished my tube between the rim and tire, they told me. I figured that could be the culprit because I didn’t really check to make sure it wasn’t squished. Next time, I’ll know.

But my woes, don’t end there. I felt pretty silly having only 1 spare inner tube, so I wandered over to Bikechain, the student-run group at the University of Toronto that teaches you how to fix your own bike – and also sells cheap inner tubes. There was only one staff at the time, and I was sans bike, so I quickly picked up 5 inner tubes and brought them home.

Only to discover, yes, I bought the right size but my valve was wrong! I had just bought 5 inner tubes with the Schrader valve, but I needed the Presta valve!

So I lugged out my old bike (I have no clue how I lasted 7 months with a daily commute on that heavy clunker!), and rode to the closest bicycle shop. To clear them out of inner tubes. I only bought 2. And they were over $1 more expensive than those from Bikechain, and the exact same inner tube.

Armed with the proper inner tube, I decided to replace my inner tube yet again. It didn’t take me nearly as long; I must be improving, I thought. Next, I checked to make sure I had no squished tire. I didn’t. Great! And then I pumped up the tire. And pumped, and pumped, and got it up to 120 psi! Woohoo! I removed the pump and took a sigh of relief. Not an instant later, the tube explodes AGAIN!  Now I am positively in tears, and know I need someone to help me figure this out.

Thankfully, Rob was coming over. I told him it was do or die because I only had one tube left. He supervised me and showed me a different way to assemble the inner tube and tire. I was putting the inner tube on first, then the tire. He assembled the inner tube inside the tire first, and then mounted the whole thing on the rim. Sounded good to me. So we pumped, and pumped, and pumped. 120 PSI! No blow-out! We pumped my front tire to 120 psi. I was good to go! I just need to get more tubes since my back-up tubes are down to zero, but no rush..

The next morning I ride to work. Perfect! It was just technique that was the problem. I return to my bike after work, drive it no more than 6 feet, when I feel like my breaks are rubbing my tire. I look down and I have a flat! No way! Not again! And I have no spare tube.. gah!

I take the subway home, grab 2 new tubes from another bike store. Another $2 more per tube. I ask  whether some inner tubes are more prone to leaking. I only biked 5 km before I got a new flat, I explained. He suggested that perhaps I had something stuck inside my tire that I couldn’t see. I should clean the inside really well. Excellent suggestion, I thought, and planned to do that next.

Before I went to bed, I cleaned the inside of my tire, feeling nothing, but thinking it was something small I couldn’t see. I made sure my inner tube didn’t touch the floor and mistakenly pick up rocks, etc. I replaced the inner tube, with the new Rob-style technique. I pumped it up. And no explosions! Woohoo!

Two days go by… I bike to/from work. I rack up 20km. No problem. Those invisible rocks sure were problematic. Or maybe it was the even more expensive inner tube that did the trick. Who knows. I was doing a little cheer every time my bike still had a tire full of air.

Friday morning, my bike greets me with yet another flat tire. I am almost not surprised. What am I doing wrong? I notice that there’s an actual direction for my tire. Maybe I had it backwards and that was the problem? I don’t know.. this is all voodoo.  I replace my tire again. I figured out where my leak was. Reasonably close to my valve. Maybe it was the metal hooks I was using to help reassemble my inner tube. Apparently that’s a no-no known to cause small leaks if you squish the inner tube. OK, I will look for my plastic ones. I clean it, I replace it, I pump it up. It doesn’t explode. I ride to work.

Now I am paranoid. I have no explanations for these flat tires.

So far so good, though. I make it to work intact.

I meet Rob after work to cycle to a friend’s house. I tell him about my flat tire woes and about my paranoia. How far will I get this time? The first time was 5km. Then 20km. Now what?

He looks down at my tire nonchalantly. What’s this?, he says, pointing to a small matte area on my tire. It was less than 1 mm. I have no clue but it looked like a small rock attached to the tire. I try to flick it off but it is wedged in nicely. I use my key to dislodge it and out we pull a big piece of glass! My culprit! My front tire had a smaller piece wedged in as well.

After successfully cycling 100km the following day, I knew I was in the clear.

While there are many great tutorials on how to change your tire online, here my tips that I have each learned the hard way:

1) Ride your bike with a spare tube (with the proper valve), pump and plastic hooks to change a spare tire. Try to repump your tire to see if it is a slow leak.

2) Remove the tire first with the hooks

3) Remove the inner tube, including any valvular attachment to the rim. If you can figure out where the hole is, great! You might be able to patch it too. Soapy water helps but I also tried to squish out any air all along the inner tube.

4) Try to figure out WHY you got the flat tire. Check the outside, inside of the tire and rim. Sometimes you won’t see anything if it is from having low tire pressure that gets squished over a bump, etc. Even if you can’t see anything, clean everything.

5) Pump up the inner tube slightly, then reassemble it inside the tire. Reattach this to your rim without any hooks, if possible, and make sure your tire is in the right direction. Make sure the tube is not being squished by the rim. Be careful around the valve because that area can easily be damaged, so I usually tried to push the final bit of tire in the rim away from the valve.

6) Slowly re-inflate the tire, making sure nothing got caught. Pump up until you get to your max pressure. Make sure you have your pump on with a straight valve. Once that breaks, you need a new tube, too (a lesson from my first lat tire change).

7) Reattach your tire to your bike, making sure it is properly positioned without any friction from the breaks. Re-hook your breaks.

It seems so simple, but it can be so complicated. :)

And now, about the recipe: Chocolate Brownie Power Bars. This has been my favourite energy bar for biking so far. I prefer moist, not so sweet bars that travel well. I really liked the cocoa mint nibbles, but they tasted like dates after they had been warmed in the sun. They were much better straight from the fridge for their fudge-y texture.

Adapted from Enlightened Cooking, these are similar to the cocoa nibbles but had more substance to them. They tasted more like a brownie and stayed that way after travelling with me all day. They also had a creamy taste which I think came from the milk powder. I originally threw it in because I had leftovers without a purpose (I originally bought some from the bulk store to make Momofuku’s Crack Pie). Now I think I have a super purpose for it, though, and will have to get myself some more.

This is my submission to this week’s Weekend Herb Blogging hosted by me and to Slightly Indulgent Tuesdays.

Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles

1 cup walnuts and/or almonds
1-1/4 cups soft dates, pitted
2 tbsp cocoa powder (not Dutch process)
1/8 cup wheat germ
1 tablespoon ground flaxseeds
1 tsp vanilla
1/3 cup nonfat dry milk powder (optional)

1. Pulse nuts in food processor until finely ground. Add the dates and pulse until finely chopped and the mixture begins to resemble a thick “dough”. Add the cocoa powder, wheat germ, and flaxseed meal. Process until blended. Add water until the mixture comes together as a ball that rolls around the edge of the processor bowl (this may take a while–up to 5 minutes or so; occasionally stop and scrape sides of processor to push the mixture toward the blades).

2. The “dough” is ready when, if you pinch some and press it between your fingers, it sticks together readily and looks a bit shiny.  (Sometimes if the dates are dry, this doesn’t happen easily; in that case, sprinkle in up to 2 tsp. water along with the vanilla, and proceed as above).  The mixture should NOT be as soft as a cookie dough, but more like clay.

3. Place a clean piece of plastic wrap on the counter and turn the mixture onto it.  Using your hands, form the mixture into a log about 8 inches (20 cm.) long.  Try to compress the mixture as much as possible so you have a very dense log.  Wrap with the plastic and roll the log one or two times, compressing it with your hands, to squeeze out any air spaces.

4. Refrigerate the log overnight or at least 2-3 hours. Slice off small nibbles. I further rolled them into balls before wrapping them individually in plastic wrap. Store refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Makes 16 nibbles (per nibble with walnuts only: 96 calories, 11g carbs, 5g fat, 3.5 g protein)

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20 Responses

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  1. Rob said, on August 30, 2010 at 7:21 AM

    It was quite an ordeal! I’m very happy we figured it out. I guess I learned some things, too :)

  2. Rob said, on August 30, 2010 at 7:22 AM

    Also: I didn’t know that your bike was a girl. I’ve always thought of my bike as an “it”. hehe

  3. Heidi said, on August 30, 2010 at 9:03 AM

    Sorry about all your tire woes! Have a few more of these tasty balls and you’ll feel much better. I had tasted these already and can confirm that these are really awesome.

  4. Camilla said, on August 30, 2010 at 10:30 AM

    I am thrilled you liked my recipe, Janet!

    Cheers,

    Camilla

  5. Priya said, on August 30, 2010 at 4:36 PM

    Omg, absolutely divine..feel like picking some..

  6. Priya (Yallapantula) Mitharwal said, on August 30, 2010 at 6:36 PM

    wow, those tire/tube troubles can be very frustrating sometimes. I don’t bike anymore but used to when I was in school/college.

    Those powder nibbles look divine.

  7. susan from food blogga said, on August 30, 2010 at 8:24 PM

    What a delicious and healthy recipe! It would be a sweet change of pace from my power bars too.

  8. Xiaolu said, on September 1, 2010 at 2:23 PM

    Sorry to hear about your tire problems. I’m not a biker, but I can tell how frustrating it must be for you. As for cheese brownie nibbles, they look like the perfect thing for me to munch on now that I’m back in school. Just the snack I’ve been looking for :).

  9. [...] eastern and Mediterranean dishes, my contribution to this week’s Weekend Herb Blogging was an All-Natural Chocolate Brownie Power Nibble made with dates and [...]

  10. Sarah@buttered-up.com said, on September 7, 2010 at 8:45 AM

    This really looks amazing. Bookmarked! :D

  11. [...] the same day I had my flat tire, complete with 2 exploded inner tubes while trying to repair it, I had this for [...]

  12. [...] over 4000-km on my bike this year, I guess I don’t exercise enough to get bored of the high energy snacks. Oats and dates have played prominent roles in many of the snacks, but I wanted to [...]

  13. [...] @ Celiac Teen (Plum Quinoa Cake)42. Katrina @ Gluten Free Gidget- Chickpea “Nuggets”43. Janet@ The Taste Space- All-Natural Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles44. Lisa @ Real Food Digest (Almond Flour Waffles)45. Jess @ ATX Gluten-Free (Peanut Butter Recipe: [...]

  14. [...] their health benefits, I find they can whip up to be nice and creamy, and have worked well in my energy balls and create a nice base for muhammara, the delicious Middle Eastern roasted red pepper and walnut [...]

  15. [...] Ontario on our bikes. Anything within 180km was fair game. We cycled from Toronto to see his parents in Woodstock and the following year, I cycled to Kitchener/Waterloo for a party. While it was fun, [...]

  16. [...] Celiac Teen (Plum Quinoa Cake) 42. Katrina @ Gluten Free Gidget- Chickpea “Nuggets” 43. Janet@ The Taste Space- All-Natural Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles 44. Lisa @ Real Food Digest (Almond Flour Waffles) 45. Jess @ ATX Gluten-Free (Peanut Butter [...]

  17. [...] Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles [...]

  18. [...] made granola bars before, but those had refined sugars and butter. I’ve also made oodles of raw energy treats, but they were usually more [...]

  19. [...] Chocolate Brownie Power Nibbles [...]


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